Windsor was originally in Middlefield Township, along with Orwell. It was detached from Middlefield in 1811.

Windsor was originally in Middlefield Township, along with Orwell. It was detached from Middlefield in 1811.

Energy of Original Owners Sparked Early Growth

By Catherine Ellsworth (1976)

Windsor Township Constable Howard Skinner was handed a directive on February 22, 1834, which read, "you are hereby commanded to warn John C. Little forthwith to depart from the said township of Windsor."

The order was signed by the Overseers of the Poor, Skene D. Sacket and Timothy Grover. Such an order was a common occurrence in pioneer communhites when some individual was found to have no visible means of support, and not making much effort to remedy the situation. Work was the key word of those early days. with every individual from child to adult having their share of home and community responsibility.

Windsor, in the southwestern corner of Ashtabula County. has been designated as a National Historic site at its main crossroads, an area untouched by "rural renewal". This, also, is one of the few communities to have its first frame home still in use. The residence now owned by Edward Gruman at the intersection of Wiswell and Stoneville Roads, was built by Jonathan Higley in 1805.

The Windsor territory was originally allotted in the Connecticut Land Co. drawing of 1798, to Simeon Griswold and William Eldridge, residents of Windsor, Connecticut. Eldridge. in 1801, sold Griswold the greater portion of his share in the Western Reserve.

Windsor was originally in Middlefield Township, along with Orwell. It was detached from Middlefield in 1811.

Though it is the farthest point in the county from the first survey party landing at Conneaut, less than three years later it was being settled, much ahead of some other townships. The only reason seems to have been the willingness and energy of the first owners. Solomon Griswold, brother of Simeon, and George Phelps, brother-in-law, were the first pioneers in Windsor.

Phelps traveled the southern route to his property in 1799, building his cabin on Lot 2, in the southeastern area, along Phelps Creek, named for him. He brought his wife and two children. He moved to Warren four years later.

The southern route from Connecticut cut southwesterly from Albany, across the Alleghenies to Pittsburgh, to the southern border of the Reserve. The northern route, traveled by Griswold, his wife and six daughters. moved westward from Albany, up the Mohawk River, and along the southern shore of the lakes, or on the water to the Reserve.

Griswold built his cabin on Lot 8, of the third range, in the northeastern section of Windsor. His was a popular home for newcomers, as he was known as a considerate host. Griswold was an associate judge of the first county court organized, having served in the same capacity under the territorial government.

The following years saw the arrival of many more families, including the Jewells, Jonathan Higley, Joseph Alderman, Skene Sacket, Oliver Loomis, Elijah Hill, and John White. The largest number arrived in 1812 and 1813, from Tolland, Connecticut, bringing Grovers, Barnards, Rawdons, Winslows, Clapps, Morgans and Norris families.

The pioneers were so anxious for all intended settlers to arrive, that they banded together with oxen and axes to clear a storm strewn road from Harpersfield when a new arrival was heard to be stranded there.

Windsor was officially organized as a township in July, 1811, during a meeting at the Griswold home, chaired by Jonathan Higley. Offices named that day were: clerk, Ebenezer K. Lampson; trustees, Samuel Higle. Michael Tomlinson, and Timothy Alderman; appraisers. Samuel Higley and Jonathan Higley.

Energy of Original Owners Sparked Early Growth

By Catherine Ellsworth (1976)

Windsor Township Constable Howard Skinner was handed a directive on February 22, 1834, which read, "you are hereby commanded to warn John C. Little forthwith to depart from the said township of Windsor."

The order was signed by the Overseers of the Poor, Skene D. Sacket and Timothy Grover. Such an order was a common occurrence in pioneer communhites when some individual was found to have no visible means of support, and not making much effort to remedy the situation. Work was the key word of those early days. with every individual from child to adult having their share of home and community responsibility.

Windsor, in the southwestern corner of Ashtabula County. has been designated as a National Historic site at its main crossroads, an area untouched by "rural renewal". This, also, is one of the few communities to have its first frame home still in use. The residence now owned by Edward Gruman at the intersection of Wiswell and Stoneville Roads, was built by Jonathan Higley in 1805.

The Windsor territory was originally allotted in the Connecticut Land Co. drawing of 1798, to Simeon Griswold and William Eldridge, residents of Windsor, Connecticut. Eldridge. in 1801, sold Griswold the greater portion of his share in the Western Reserve.

Windsor was originally in Middlefield Township, along with Orwell. It was detached from Middlefield in 1811.

Though it is the farthest point in the county from the first survey party landing at Conneaut, less than three years later it was being settled, much ahead of some other townships. The only reason seems to have been the willingness and energy of the first owners. Solomon Griswold, brother of Simeon, and George Phelps, brother-in-law, were the first pioneers in Windsor.

Phelps traveled the southern route to his property in 1799, building his cabin on Lot 2, in the southeastern area, along Phelps Creek, named for him. He brought his wife and two children. He moved to Warren four years later.

The southern route from Connecticut cut southwesterly from Albany, across the Alleghenies to Pittsburgh, to the southern border of the Reserve. The northern route, traveled by Griswold, his wife and six daughters. moved westward from Albany, up the Mohawk River, and along the southern shore of the lakes, or on the water to the Reserve.

Griswold built his cabin on Lot 8, of the third range, in the northeastern section of Windsor. His was a popular home for newcomers, as he was known as a considerate host. Griswold was an associate judge of the first county court organized, having served in the same capacity under the territorial government.

The following years saw the arrival of many more families, including the Jewells, Jonathan Higley, Joseph Alderman, Skene Sacket, Oliver Loomis, Elijah Hill, and John White. The largest number arrived in 1812 and 1813, from Tolland, Connecticut, bringing Grovers, Barnards, Rawdons, Winslows, Clapps, Morgans and Norris families.

The pioneers were so anxious for all intended settlers to arrive, that they banded together with oxen and axes to clear a storm strewn road from Harpersfield when a new arrival was heard to be stranded there.

Windsor was officially organized as a township in July, 1811, during a meeting at the Griswold home, chaired by Jonathan Higley. Offices named that day were: clerk, Ebenezer K. Lampson; trustees, Samuel Higle. Michael Tomlinson, and Timothy Alderman; appraisers. Samuel Higley and Jonathan Higley.

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