Return to Ashtabula County

Return to Ashtabula County

On reaching Ashtabula on my return voyage I took the stage with Al Phelps as driver and no man could beat him; and after a short ride we disembarked at Jefferson. I walked down to my old home which I found had been sold to Messrs. Barton and Jenkins, and Mrs. Garlick had become the wife of Aseph Carter, then living on the place on South Chestnut St., now owned by the estate of Judge Woodbury.

I found work with T.S. Edwards, a half-brother of Mrs. Garlick-Carter. Remained with him much of this time until 1870. Six years before this date I enlisted in Co. G. 3rd U.S. Heavy Artillery, and was on duty at Fort Pickering, at Memphis, Tenn. Remained there until May 27, 1865 when I was discharged and came home at once. Found many things changed during my year's absence at the "front." Mr. Edwards had disposed of the old farm in Dorset and was engaged in the grocery business on Main St. in Ashtabula, not far from the Fisk House. He gave me a place at his fireside and I remained with him until 1870. He then moved to Austinburg and I came to live with Judge J.A. Giddings, who then occupied the old Giddings house at the corner of Chestnut and Walnut Sts., in Jefferson.

Six years later the old family mansion was entirely destroyed by fire, and with it all of my earthly possessions. Since then I have made my headquarters with the Giddings family, and these lines are written in the little office so long occupied by that staunch friend of the colored man, Hon. Joshua R. Giddings.

On reaching Ashtabula on my return voyage I took the stage with Al Phelps as driver and no man could beat him; and after a short ride we disembarked at Jefferson. I walked down to my old home which I found had been sold to Messrs. Barton and Jenkins, and Mrs. Garlick had become the wife of Aseph Carter, then living on the place on South Chestnut St., now owned by the estate of Judge Woodbury.

I found work with T.S. Edwards, a half-brother of Mrs. Garlick-Carter. Remained with him much of this time until 1870. Six years before this date I enlisted in Co. G. 3rd U.S. Heavy Artillery, and was on duty at Fort Pickering, at Memphis, Tenn. Remained there until May 27, 1865 when I was discharged and came home at once. Found many things changed during my year's absence at the "front." Mr. Edwards had disposed of the old farm in Dorset and was engaged in the grocery business on Main St. in Ashtabula, not far from the Fisk House. He gave me a place at his fireside and I remained with him until 1870. He then moved to Austinburg and I came to live with Judge J.A. Giddings, who then occupied the old Giddings house at the corner of Chestnut and Walnut Sts., in Jefferson.

Six years later the old family mansion was entirely destroyed by fire, and with it all of my earthly possessions. Since then I have made my headquarters with the Giddings family, and these lines are written in the little office so long occupied by that staunch friend of the colored man, Hon. Joshua R. Giddings.

Of my immediate family I can only say that since they left the south, they have become widely separated. My mother, however, died in 1893 at my sisters, Mrs. Leathe Lewis, at 1847 I returned to A.K. Garlick's in Millsford, now called Dorset, and I was there most of the time until 1852 the year that he died. I then went to live with his brother-in-law, Mr. T.S. Edwards, who lived in the old log house on the plank road in Dorset. He kept the gate awhile and took toll from passengers who went through. Mr. Edwards lived in Dorset until about the year of '64 and he then moved to Ashtabula and went into the grocery business with E.R. Williams. After running this business a few years he sold out and went to Michigan when he made himself rich in the lumber business. He has since died and left his three sons well off.

Of my immediate family I can only say that since they left the south, they have become widely separated. My mother, however, died in 1893 at my sisters, Mrs. Leathe Lewis, at 1847 I returned to A.K. Garlick's in Millsford, now called Dorset, and I was there most of the time until 1852 the year that he died. I then went to live with his brother-in-law, Mr. T.S. Edwards, who lived in the old log house on the plank road in Dorset. He kept the gate awhile and took toll from passengers who went through. Mr. Edwards lived in Dorset until about the year of '64 and he then moved to Ashtabula and went into the grocery business with E.R. Williams. After running this business a few years he sold out and went to Michigan when he made himself rich in the lumber business. He has since died and left his three sons well off.

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