1843-1846

1843-1846

I remained with Mr. Garlick from 1843 to 1846 attending district school a portion of the time during the winter, working on the place the rest of the time.

 The first winter I attended school, I was awarded the second prize for the greatest improvement in writing. Miss Sophia Houghton, an elder sister of the late Mrs. Judge Betts, of Jefferson, taking the first prize.

 On accepting Mr. Garlick's hospitality and home, he addressed me as "Charley" and becoming known as Charley Garlick, I, at my benefactors suggestion, adopted the name I have ever since borne. About my first work at my new home was grading the lawn, and here I learned the northern way of driving oxen by the "Hee and Gaw" method. In the South cattle are guided with a rope hitched to one horn, and I presume no one even made a more awkward spectacle than I did during my first first with that lively team of steers. I however, conquered, and a creditable job was the result. I did so well that I was next put to clearing up several acres of land on the farm now owned by Dwight Carpenter.

In '46 Mr. Garlick and myself went East in search of my brother, who we thought was in Butler County. At Gurdy's Run near Pittsburg we encountered a camp meeting, and here we soon found ourselves in hot water. The impression obtained that Mr. Garlick was a slave holder and was using me as a decoy to obtain possession of my brothers, who were living in the vicinity of Mr. Marshall's. We were both made prisoners, but on Mr. Garlick's producing a paper upon which was the name of Deacon Hubbard, of Ashtabula, a lake terminus of the underground railroad, (see Hubbard House) he was allowed to depart, they escorting him from the camp ground to assure his going. I escaped the same night and made my way to Squire Marshall's where I was delighted to find my brothers. I remained there one year before returning to Ohio.

I remained with Mr. Garlick from 1843 to 1846 attending district school a portion of the time during the winter, working on the place the rest of the time.

 The first winter I attended school, I was awarded the second prize for the greatest improvement in writing. Miss Sophia Houghton, an elder sister of the late Mrs. Judge Betts, of Jefferson, taking the first prize.

 On accepting Mr. Garlick's hospitality and home, he addressed me as "Charley" and becoming known as Charley Garlick, I, at my benefactors suggestion, adopted the name I have ever since borne. About my first work at my new home was grading the lawn, and here I learned the northern way of driving oxen by the "Hee and Gaw" method. In the South cattle are guided with a rope hitched to one horn, and I presume no one even made a more awkward spectacle than I did during my first first with that lively team of steers. I however, conquered, and a creditable job was the result. I did so well that I was next put to clearing up several acres of land on the farm now owned by Dwight Carpenter.

In '46 Mr. Garlick and myself went East in search of my brother, who we thought was in Butler County. At Gurdy's Run near Pittsburg we encountered a camp meeting, and here we soon found ourselves in hot water. The impression obtained that Mr. Garlick was a slave holder and was using me as a decoy to obtain possession of my brothers, who were living in the vicinity of Mr. Marshall's. We were both made prisoners, but on Mr. Garlick's producing a paper upon which was the name of Deacon Hubbard, of Ashtabula, a lake terminus of the underground railroad, (see Hubbard House) he was allowed to depart, they escorting him from the camp ground to assure his going. I escaped the same night and made my way to Squire Marshall's where I was delighted to find my brothers. I remained there one year before returning to Ohio.

Page 3: 1843-1846 (you are here)

Page 3: 1843-1846 (you are here)

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