Later Notes, Part 2

Later Notes, Part 2

The nation was poor in those early days from the effects of the war of 1812 and the slave trade which was a load too heavy for any Christian nation to carry in a civilized world; the people were patient and shut their eyes at the sight of this great evil, but time and tide woke them up in a way this country will not forget. Soon came a great slaughter of human beings for principle, a thing that all nations do sometimes. Our country is now on the road to progress and with harmonious action of the people irrespective of party they can bring prosperity and hold it in this county.

All we have to look forward to now is our trade with foreign nations. When that is established we are made as a nation. I hope that after this comes to be a fact that this nation will get up pride enough to stop this barbarous lynching that is so prevalent in this country, north and south. We all admit that crime and the criminal must and should be punished to the extent of the law. That is just and right before God and man.

When on my journey to Ohio I stopped with a very fine old gentleman, a Quaker. He was a gentleman in every respect. He treated me royally in every respect. He had nothing that was too good to use for me. I begged him to stop putting so much attention on me as I had not been used to it in the south. I had been held in slavery and had not learned to read. Mr. Daniel had a very nice family of boys and girls, they knew how to treat a runaway slave as well as the older folks and I doubt not they would have made a good defense in my behalf if the slaveholders had come when I was there at the house of Daniel Bonsill in the town of Columbiana.

 In the year of 1849 I went to work for Horace close enough to an ash stub and the sun was shining very bright, and I heard some noise and looked up, and there was as nice a swarm of bees as I ever saw, in that ash stub about ten feet up from the ground. I got the honey out, the weight about 35 pounds. It was a good one, I sold it and got the money.

 During the time I was at Mr. Lindsley's, Mr. R. Lundy's store at West Andover was burned and there was a great loss to somebody. The money was scattered all around on the West Andover corners but I think most of it was found. Dr. Reed was gone from Andover then or went soon after. There was a time when A.R. Garlick and A.M. Reed were the leaders in the social circle in West Andover. That was when West Andover was the city instead of the center as now. Those men are all gone and we will be gone before many years. Such is life. Dust we are and dust we must return. Most every year brings us the sad news of the death of some of our old Andover friends who are away off in the far west. I have just read of J.M. Kellogg's death in the west and Trues Creesey's wife's death out west. She was once the flower of the Coleman family in Wayne, this county. My occupation has been working on farms and whitewashing, and calsomining and decorating houses. Of late, being unable to farm has driven me to this kind of work.

The nation was poor in those early days from the effects of the war of 1812 and the slave trade which was a load too heavy for any Christian nation to carry in a civilized world; the people were patient and shut their eyes at the sight of this great evil, but time and tide woke them up in a way this country will not forget. Soon came a great slaughter of human beings for principle, a thing that all nations do sometimes. Our country is now on the road to progress and with harmonious action of the people irrespective of party they can bring prosperity and hold it in this county.

All we have to look forward to now is our trade with foreign nations. When that is established we are made as a nation. I hope that after this comes to be a fact that this nation will get up pride enough to stop this barbarous lynching that is so prevalent in this country, north and south. We all admit that crime and the criminal must and should be punished to the extent of the law. That is just and right before God and man.

When on my journey to Ohio I stopped with a very fine old gentleman, a Quaker. He was a gentleman in every respect. He treated me royally in every respect. He had nothing that was too good to use for me. I begged him to stop putting so much attention on me as I had not been used to it in the south. I had been held in slavery and had not learned to read. Mr. Daniel had a very nice family of boys and girls, they knew how to treat a runaway slave as well as the older folks and I doubt not they would have made a good defense in my behalf if the slaveholders had come when I was there at the house of Daniel Bonsill in the town of Columbiana.

 In the year of 1849 I went to work for Horace close enough to an ash stub and the sun was shining very bright, and I heard some noise and looked up, and there was as nice a swarm of bees as I ever saw, in that ash stub about ten feet up from the ground. I got the honey out, the weight about 35 pounds. It was a good one, I sold it and got the money.

 During the time I was at Mr. Lindsley's, Mr. R. Lundy's store at West Andover was burned and there was a great loss to somebody. The money was scattered all around on the West Andover corners but I think most of it was found. Dr. Reed was gone from Andover then or went soon after. There was a time when A.R. Garlick and A.M. Reed were the leaders in the social circle in West Andover. That was when West Andover was the city instead of the center as now. Those men are all gone and we will be gone before many years. Such is life. Dust we are and dust we must return. Most every year brings us the sad news of the death of some of our old Andover friends who are away off in the far west. I have just read of J.M. Kellogg's death in the west and Trues Creesey's wife's death out west. She was once the flower of the Coleman family in Wayne, this county. My occupation has been working on farms and whitewashing, and calsomining and decorating houses. Of late, being unable to farm has driven me to this kind of work.

 Later Notes, Part 2  You are  (HERE)

 Later Notes, Part 2  You are  (HERE)

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